Humans of FM: Ethan Menconi

By: Jeanne Winton 

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Photo of Ethan Menconi ( Sophomore ) by Jeanne Winton

I was in 8th grade and it was a Sunday, that was when I used to go to church, and there was this kid next door who also went to our church so I would usually hang out with him after. One day I was over there goofing off or whatever, and it was right in the middle of a snowstorm, and a bunch of ice had just covered the parking lot in the back of the church. There was no one else there so we were playing basketball. I was running and then suddenly I slipped.

I remember sitting there (and it was happening pretty slowly) thinking “wow this sucks, I’m falling right now.” I remember thinking how I would get up in a minute, but I didn’t; I broke my leg. I dislocated the ball of my hip, broke my bone all the way through, and fractured a bit too. Basically the ball of my hip and the upper part of my femur weren’t attached to me anymore.

So an ambulance finally came, and they gave me some Dilaudid, which they said was like 10 times stronger than morphine. That stuff was awesome. They were doing x-rays, and had to lift my leg up with my heel on a block. When they pulled the block away, my leg just flopped down. I expected them to pull it away slowly, but they didn’t, so I started screaming and swearing. I remember my dad was upset at me, he was talking to my mom and saying, “I don’t even know why he’s swearing. I don’t like it.” I was just thinking, “Jesus Christ, dad my leg is freaking broken cut me a freaking break.”

So they were wheeling me into the recovery room, because for the longest time, like days afterwards, I couldn’t move my leg at all. It felt like a piece of lead; I just couldn’t move it. That was so weird, not being in control of your body. I think it was a good experience though, because after that I was in a wheelchair for quite a while. It really made me appreciate being able to walk, and knowing I would be able to walk again. There are some people who aren’t able to walk, and I guess it was a humbling experience. But being in that position, it made me realize that it’s not funny; it’s not a joke.

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